Dr. Nagourney's Blog

New Drugs Are Not Always Better Drugs - Renal Cell Carcinoma Success

By Robert A. Nagourney, MD

The most common form of renal (kidney) carcinoma is the clear cell variant.

These tumors are driven by mutations in the VHL gene and are associated with hyper-vascularity.

Understanding the pathogenesis of this disease has enabled researchers to develop new classes of drugs that target VEGF, both at the protein level (Bevacizumab) and at the tyrosine kinase level (sorafenib, sunitinib, etc.).

An additional class of drugs targets the intracellular metabolic pathway known as mTOR.

Patients newly diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma of the clear cell type are treated with drugs that target these pathways. However, responses occur in the minority of patients. It is unclear why some patients respond to these interventions while others fail.

The EVA-PCD™ analysis is equally applicable to classic cytotoxic drugs and the newer classes of targeted agents, which include Sunitinib and Sorafenib and the rapalogs like Everolimus and Temsirolimus.

This enables our lab to explore whether renal cell carcinoma patients are likely to respond to vascular or mTOR targeting classes of drugs. Interestingly, patients who do not respond to these classes of drugs may nonetheless have sensitivity to cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. 

Stage 4 Kidney Cancer Patient Success

One example currently undergoing therapy is a 51 year old male who was presented in February 2009 with widely metastatic renal cell (kidney) carcinoma, and a destructive lesion of the right femur requiring open surgical stabilization.

Tissue removed from the patient’s femur at the time of the orthopedic surgery was submitted for an EVA-PCD™ analysis.

The results were highly instructive, indicating clear resistance to the VEGF targeting agents and the rapalogs but substantial sensitivity to a novel combination of cytotoxic drugs.

The patient received an opinion from a renowned renal cell expert who immediately placed him on sunitinib (Sutent™).

When he failed sunitinib he was then placed upon Everolimus (Afinitor).

Again the patient failed to respond.

Progression of his disease was heralded by brain metastases that required both neurosurgery and cranial irradiation. He then revealed rapidly progressive pulmonary metastases as well as large painful bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy and large painful subcutaneous lesions.

Triple Combination of Drugs Given

In light of the patient’s failure of targeted agents, he was treated with a three-drug combination identified to be active in the EVA-PCD™ analysis.

The response to date has been dramatic, with complete resolution of subcutaneous lesions and lymph nodes , and objective improvement in the pulmonary metastases by CT scan.

The patient remains on therapy, with continued excellent response.

This is but one example of an unexpectedly good response to classic cytotoxic drugs following a failure to respond to the newest classes of targeted agents.

These experiences reinforce the need for cancer therapies to be individualized. They also remind us, as physicians, that it is the good outcome of the patient not the therapy applied that constitute successful application of the healing arts.